Apr 27, 2017
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Free Prescription Drug Coupons

Coupons for Epilepsy Prescription Drugs

Free Prescription Drug Coupons! Download your FREE discount coupon(s) below to save money on Epilepsy medication at pharmacies across the country. These coupons are pre-activated and can be used immediately to save up to 90% on your prescription drugs.

Epilepsy Drug Coupon List
Drug/Dosage Information Coupon
CLONAZEPAM POW Drug Info
CLONAZEPAM TAB 0.5MG Drug Info
CLONAZEPAM TAB 1MG Drug Info
CLONAZEPAM TAB 2MG Drug Info
DEPAKOTE TAB 125MG DR Drug Info
DEPAKOTE TAB 250MG DR Drug Info
DEPAKOTE TAB 500MG DR Drug Info
DEPAKOTE ER TAB 250MG Drug Info
DEPAKOTE ER TAB 500MG Drug Info
GABAPENTIN CAP 100MG Drug Info
GABAPENTIN CAP 300MG Drug Info
GABAPENTIN CAP 400MG Drug Info
GABAPENTIN POW Drug Info
GABAPENTIN SOL 250/5ML Drug Info
GABAPENTIN TAB 600MG Drug Info
GABAPENTIN TAB 800MG Drug Info
GABITRIL TAB 2MG Drug Info
GABITRIL TAB 4MG Drug Info
GABITRIL TAB 12MG Drug Info
GABITRIL TAB 16MG Drug Info
KEPPRA INJ 500/5ML Drug Info
KEPPRA SOL 100MG/ML Drug Info
KEPPRA TAB 250MG Drug Info
KEPPRA TAB 500MG Drug Info
KEPPRA TAB 750MG Drug Info
KEPPRA TAB 1000MG Drug Info
KEPPRA XR TAB 500MG Drug Info
KEPPRA XR TAB 750MG Drug Info
PHENYTOIN INJ 50MG/ML Drug Info
PHENYTOIN POW Drug Info
PHENYTOIN POW SODIUM Drug Info
PHENYTOIN SUS 100/4ML Drug Info
PHENYTOIN SUS 125/5ML Drug Info
PHENYTOIN EX CAP 100MG Drug Info
PHENYTOIN EX CAP 200MG Drug Info
PHENYTOIN EX CAP 300MG Drug Info
TOPAMAX TAB 100MG Drug Info
TOPAMAX SPR CAP 15MG Drug Info
TOPAMAX SPR CAP 25MG Drug Info
Clonazepam Coupon for Prescription Discounts

Print this free Clonazepam Coupon and get significant discounts on your next prescription!

How To Use
Pharmacy Coupons

These coupons work just like a pharmacy discount card. Simply bring the coupon/card into any CVS/pharmacy, Walgreens, Rite Aid, Walmart, Target, Kmart, Kroger, Longs Drug Store, Safeway, or any participating pharmacy, and enjoy substantial savings on almost every medication available.

Major Pharmacy Chains:

  • CVS Pharmacy
  • Walmart Pharmacy
  • Kroger
  • Walgreens
  • Target Pharmacy
  • Rite Aid
  • Safeway
  • Kmart Pharmacy
  • Stop & Shop
  • Giant
  • Shopko
  • Shop'n Save Pharmacy
  • Winn Dixie
  • Giant Eagle Pharmacy
  • Albertsons Savon Pharmacy
  • Longs Drugs
  • Savemart Pharmacy
  • A&P Pharmacy
  • Bi-Lo
  • Cub Pharmacy
  • Meijer Pharmacy
  • Raley's
  • Tom Thumb
  • Randalls
  • FredMeyer
  • ACME Savon Pharmacy
  • Aurora Pharmacy
  • Shaws Osco Pharmacy
  • Wegmans
See Entire Pharmacy List

Epilepsy Information

Epilepsy is a common and diverse set of chronic neurological disorders characterized by seizures. Some definitions of epilepsy require that seizures be recurrent and unprovoked, but others require only a single seizure combined with brain alterations which increase the chance of future seizures.

Epileptic seizures result from abnormal, excessive or hypersynchronous neuronal activity in the brain. About 50 million people worldwide have epilepsy, and nearly 90% of epilepsy occurs in developing countries. Epilepsy becomes more common as people age. Onset of new cases occur most frequently in infants and the elderly. As a consequence of brain surgery, epileptic seizures may occur in recovering patients.

Epilepsy is usually controlled, but not cured, with medication. However, over 30% of people with epilepsy do not have seizure control even with the best available medications. Surgery may be considered in difficult cases. Not all epilepsy syndromes are lifelong – some forms are confined to particular stages of childhood. Epilepsy should not be understood as a single disorder, but rather as syndromic with vastly divergent symptoms, all involving episodic abnormal electrical activity in the brain and numerous seizures

Management and Medications

Epilepsy is usually treated with medication prescribed by a physician; primary caregivers, neurologists, and neurosurgeons all frequently care for people with epilepsy. However, it has been stressed that accurate differentiation between generalized and partial seizures is especially important in determining the appropriate treatment. In some cases the implantation of a stimulator of the vagus nerve, or a special diet can be helpful. Neurosurgical operations for epilepsy can be palliative, reducing the frequency or severity of seizures; or, in some patients, an operation can be curative.

The proper initial response to a generalized tonic-clonic epileptic seizure is to roll the person on the side (recovery position) to prevent ingestion of fluids into the lungs, which can result in choking and death. Should the person regurgitate, this should be allowed to drip out the side of the person's mouth. The person should be prevented from self-injury by moving them away from sharp edges, and placing something soft beneath the head. If a seizure lasts longer than 5 minutes, or if more than one seizure occurs without regaining consciousness emergency medical services should be contacted.

The mainstay of treatment of epilepsy is anticonvulsant medications. Often, anticonvulsant medication treatment will be lifelong and can have major effects on quality of life. The choice among anticonvulsants and their effectiveness differs by epilepsy syndrome. Mechanisms, effectiveness for particular epilepsy syndromes, and side-effects differ among the individual anticonvulsant medications.

Epilepsy Medication Information

Gabapentin

Gabapentin (brand names Fanatrex, Gabarone, Gralise, Neurontin, Nupentin) is a pharmaceutical drug, specifically a GABA analogue. It was originally developed for the treatment of epilepsy, and currently is also used to relieve neuropathic pain. There are, however, concerns regarding the quality of the trials conducted.

Phenytoin

Phenytoin sodium is a commonly used antiepileptic. Phenytoin (fœnit'oin, IPA) acts to suppress the abnormal brain activity seen in seizure by reducing electrical conductance among brain cells by stabilizing the inactive state of voltage-gated sodium channels. Aside from seizures, it is an option in the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia in the event that carbamazepine or other first-line treatment seems inappropriate.

Important Epilepsy Links

Epilepsy Sites

Epilepsy Forums