Aug 23, 2017
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Free Prescription Drug Coupons

Coupons for Multiple Sclerosis Prescription Drugs

Free Prescription Drug Coupons! Download your FREE discount coupon(s) below to save money on Multiple Sclerosis medication at pharmacies across the country. These coupons are pre-activated and can be used immediately to save up to 90% on your prescription drugs.

Multiple Sclerosis Drug Coupon List
Drug/Dosage Information Coupon
AVONEX KIT 30MCG Drug Info
BETASERON INJ 0.3MG Drug Info
COPAXONE KIT 20MG/ML Drug Info
REBIF INJ 22/0.5 Drug Info
REBIF INJ 44/0.5 Drug Info
Avonex Coupon for Prescription Discounts

Print this free Avonex Coupon and get significant discounts on your next prescription!

How To Use
Pharmacy Coupons

These coupons work just like a pharmacy discount card. Simply bring the coupon/card into any CVS/pharmacy, Walgreens, Rite Aid, Walmart, Target, Kmart, Kroger, Longs Drug Store, Safeway, or any participating pharmacy, and enjoy substantial savings on almost every medication available.

Major Pharmacy Chains:

  • CVS Pharmacy
  • Walmart Pharmacy
  • Kroger
  • Walgreens
  • Target Pharmacy
  • Rite Aid
  • Safeway
  • Kmart Pharmacy
  • Stop & Shop
  • Giant
  • Shopko
  • Shop'n Save Pharmacy
  • Albertsons Savon Pharmacy
  • Vons Pharmacy
  • Longs Drugs
  • Cub Pharmacy
  • Bi-Mart Pharmacy
  • Dillons Pharmacy
  • Weis Pharmacy
  • King Soopers Pharmacy
  • Pavilions Pharmacy
  • Fred's Pharmacy
  • Smith's Pharmacy
  • Tom Thumb
  • Randalls
  • FredMeyer
  • ACME Savon Pharmacy
  • Shaws Osco Pharmacy
See Entire Pharmacy List

Multiple Sclerosis Information

Multiple sclerosis (abbreviated to MS, known as disseminated sclerosis or encephalomyelitis disseminata) is an inflammatory disease in which the fatty myelin sheaths around the axons of the brain and spinal cord are damaged, leading to demyelination and scarring as well as a broad spectrum of signs and symptoms. Disease onset usually occurs in young adults, and it is more common in women. It has a prevalence that ranges between 2 and 150 per 100,000. MS was first described in 1868 by Jean-Martin Charcot.

MS affects the ability of nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord to communicate with each other effectively. Nerve cells communicate by sending electrical signals called action potentials down long fibers called axons, which are contained within an insulating substance called myelin. In MS, the body's own immune system attacks and damages the myelin. When myelin is lost, the axons can no longer effectively conduct signals. The name multiple sclerosis refers to scars (scleroses—better known as plaques or lesions) particularly in the white matter of the brain and spinal cord, which is mainly composed of myelin. Although much is known about the mechanisms involved in the disease process, the cause remains unknown. Theories include genetics or infections. Different environmental risk factors have also been found.

Almost any neurological symptom can appear with the disease, and often progresses to physical and cognitive disability. MS takes several forms, with new symptoms occurring either in discrete attacks (relapsing forms) or slowly accumulating over time (progressive forms). Between attacks, symptoms may go away completely, but permanent neurological problems often occur, especially as the disease advances.

There is no known cure for multiple sclerosis. Treatments attempt to return function after an attack, prevent new attacks, and prevent disability. MS medications can have adverse effects or be poorly tolerated, and many patients pursue alternative treatments, despite the lack of supporting scientific study. The prognosis is difficult to predict; it depends on the subtype of the disease, the individual patient's disease characteristics, the initial symptoms and the degree of disability the person experiences as time advances. Life expectancy of people with MS is 5 to 10 years lower than that of the unaffected population.

Multiple Sclerosis - Medication Information

Copaxone

Glatiramer acetate (also known as Copolymer 1, Cop-1, or Copaxone - as marketed by Teva Pharmaceuticals) is an immunomodulator drug currently used to treat multiple sclerosis. It is a random polymer of four amino acids found in myelin basic protein, namely glutamic acid, lysine, alanine, and tyrosine, and may work as a decoy for the immune system. Glatiramer acetate is approved by the FDA for reducing the frequency of relapses, but not for reducing the progression of disability. Observational studies, but not randomized controlled trials, suggest that it may reduce progression of disability.

Although the clinical definition of multiple sclerosis requires two or more episodes of symptoms and signs, glatiramer acetate is approved for treatment after single episodes. It is also used to treat relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. It is administered by subcutaneous injection.

Important Multiple Sclerosis Links

Multiple Sclerosis Sites

Multiple Sclerosis Forums